'EXCLUSIVE 20th CENTURY TRIBAL ART’

Songye Kifwebe (feminine)




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750 euro

  • Country of origin: DR of the Congo
  • Size: 36 cm H x 20 cm W
  • Materials: wood, pigments, kaolin
  • Authentic african art
Authentic, old female KIFWEBE mask of the tribe of the Songye, Congo-Katanga region.
There are some drought cracks which occurred in the course of time, as you can see from the pictures.

We also see some insect damage from long ago. The mask has suffered a bit, but that provides it with extra character!

On the inside there is a greasy related patin (sebum) because of its use as a tribal dance mask.

In the Songye language, a mask is a 'kifwebe': this term has been given to masks representing spirits and characterized by striations. Depending on the region, it may be dark with white strips, or the reverse. The kifwebe masks embodied supernatural forces. The kifwebe society used them to ward off disaster or any threat. The masks, supplemented by a woven costume and a long beard of raffia bast, dance at various ceremonies. They are worn by men who act as police at the behest of a ruler, or to intimidate the enemy.

It can be either masculine, if carved with a central crest, or feminine if displaying a plain coiffure. The size of the crest determines the magic power of the mask. Mask, colors, and costume all have symbolic meaning. The dancer who wears the male mask will display aggressive and uncontrolled behavior with the aim of encouraging social conformity, whereas the dancer who wears the female mask display more gentle and controlled movements and is assumed to be associated with reproduction ceremonies.

The use of white on the mask symbolizes positive concepts such as purity and peace, the moon and light. Red is associated with blood and fire, courage and fortitude, but also with danger and evil. Female masks essentially reflect positive forces and appear principally in dances held at night, such as during lunar ceremonies and at the investiture or death of a ruler. The mask had also the capacity to heal by means of the supernatural force it was supposed to incorporate. 

This mask was brought by a Belgian colonial railway engineer who returned to Belgium just before the independence of Congo.

ca 1950


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'EXCLUSIVE 20th CENTURY TRIBAL ART’


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Songye Kifwebe (feminine)

750 euro

  • Country of origin: DR of the Congo
  • Size: 36 cm H x 20 cm W
  • Materials: wood, pigments, kaolin
  • Authentic african art
Authentic, old female KIFWEBE mask of the tribe of the Songye, Congo-Katanga region.
There are some drought cracks which occurred in the course of time, as you can see from the pictures.

We also see some insect damage from long ago. The mask has suffered a bit, but that provides it with extra character!

On the inside there is a greasy related patin (sebum) because of its use as a tribal dance mask.

In the Songye language, a mask is a 'kifwebe': this term has been given to masks representing spirits and characterized by striations. Depending on the region, it may be dark with white strips, or the reverse. The kifwebe masks embodied supernatural forces. The kifwebe society used them to ward off disaster or any threat. The masks, supplemented by a woven costume and a long beard of raffia bast, dance at various ceremonies. They are worn by men who act as police at the behest of a ruler, or to intimidate the enemy.

It can be either masculine, if carved with a central crest, or feminine if displaying a plain coiffure. The size of the crest determines the magic power of the mask. Mask, colors, and costume all have symbolic meaning. The dancer who wears the male mask will display aggressive and uncontrolled behavior with the aim of encouraging social conformity, whereas the dancer who wears the female mask display more gentle and controlled movements and is assumed to be associated with reproduction ceremonies.

The use of white on the mask symbolizes positive concepts such as purity and peace, the moon and light. Red is associated with blood and fire, courage and fortitude, but also with danger and evil. Female masks essentially reflect positive forces and appear principally in dances held at night, such as during lunar ceremonies and at the investiture or death of a ruler. The mask had also the capacity to heal by means of the supernatural force it was supposed to incorporate. 

This mask was brought by a Belgian colonial railway engineer who returned to Belgium just before the independence of Congo.

ca 1950


Place order